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Objective: To analyze the survival predictors of patients undergoing hepatectomy for colorectal liver metastasis to determine useful indicators for therapy selection.

Summary Background Data: Although recurrence develops in more than two thirds of patients undergoing hepatectomy for colorectal liver metastasis, preoperative characteristics that might predict such recurrence have yet to be clearly identified.

Methods: Clinicopathologic data of 85 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer who underwent a curative resection of primary lesions and metastatic liver diseases at one institute were analyzed using the multivariate method with respect to both the metastatic state and the primary lesion.

Results: Multivariate analysis indicated that the aggressiveness of the primary tumor, early liver metastasis, and a large number of liver metastases were the characteristics that could be detected before hepatectomy and that independently indicated a worse survival. A three-ranked classification based on these coefficients (H-staging) was significantly related to both the recurrence rate within 6 months (7% in H-stage A, 30% in B, and 44% in C) and the 5-year survival rates (55%, 14%, and 0% respectively). An additional scoring system (H'-staging) based on the aggressiveness of the primary tumor and the level of carcinoembryonic antigen 1 to 3 months after hepatectomy was found to be related to the mode of subsequent recurrence and surgical resectability of the recurrent foci.

Conclusions: H-staging can provide useful prognostic information for the treatment of liver metastasis. H'-staging could also help in predicting the possible mode of recurrence after hepatectomy and in determining the most suitable mode of additional therapy. Further multiinstitutional studies based on a large collective database will confirm the utility of these two staging systems.

(C) 2000 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.